Steve Claypatch

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Steve started glassblowing in the fall of 2005 at the Minnesota Center for Glass Arts, in Minneapolis.  In 2008, he quit his ‘paying’ job because it no longer fit his evolving change in life.  Steve found glass blowing satisfying in many ways.  Artistic and emotional gratification was discovered in an art he never understood or thought was possible.  As he explains: “Prior to 2005, I couldn’t draw a triangle.  There is peacefulness when you are working with 2000 degree glass, and the alchemy of the process is simply amazing”.  My attention is focused on the liquidity of the material and subsequently the outside world has very little room to invade “my space”.

Mostly self-taught, Steve does travel to the Corning Museum of glass in the summer to take week long workshops.  Over the last seven years, his attention is focusing on ‘cold working’ glass.  ‘Cold working’ glass is labor intensive and uses methods that adjust the surface of the glass after it is blown.  Techniques such as engraving floral patterns, cutting and polishing facets and ‘Battuto’ are added steps he takes to complement the glass after it is cooled.

‘Battuto’ is an Italian technique, meaning to ‘strike’, or ‘hammer’.  Using a glass engraving lathe, Steve creates multiple ‘strikes’ against a diamond wheel to create new light refraction, and texture to the glass.  A finished  ‘Battuto’ bowl or vase may contain thousands of ‘cuts’ and weeks of work.

Steve describes his work as ‘artistic utilitarian’.  Vases and bowls are designed for his customers to use.  He shows his work at art fairs around Minnesota, and in his studio space in NE Minneapolis.   Additionally, the Corning Museum of Glass has honored him by representing his work in the museum store.

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Peter Jadoonath

"Mateo and Sunni lived in a small town and were high school sweet hearts. Mateo was enthusiastic about her, but Sunni was mostly enthusiastic about stars. In the end she chose the stars and lived happily ever after."

"Mateo and Sunni lived in a small town and were high school sweet hearts. Mateo was enthusiastic about her, but Sunni was mostly enthusiastic about stars. In the end she chose the stars and lived happily ever after."

Drawing and animation is the foundation of my art making life. I am quite shy at my core and drawing is a method for me to interpret the world and my life experiences.  I enjoy the challenge of making pottery shapes that act as a vehicle for me to express these ideas. I aim to animate these shapes with embedded stories, and pattern. What keeps me going is not a single act of inspiration, but more so just the act of going out to the studio and working.  Although, I  am inspired by things that are often quiet and consistent within daily life. Things such as manhole covers, music, tools, textiles, traversing, leverage, labor, language, learning,  hairstyles, and horizon lines. It’s an eclectic interpretation of life, which I imagine is fairly simple and similar for all of us.

My pots are made on a treadle wheel, they are cut and carved once the pot is cheese hard. All of the pots are fired in a gas kiln.

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